go girl
please don't go.
i'll eat you up,
i love you so.
go girl
+
i-eat-men-like-air:

john oliver is really not fucking around 
i-eat-men-like-air:

john oliver is really not fucking around 
i-eat-men-like-air:

john oliver is really not fucking around 
i-eat-men-like-air:

john oliver is really not fucking around 
i-eat-men-like-air:

john oliver is really not fucking around 
i-eat-men-like-air:

john oliver is really not fucking around 
i-eat-men-like-air:

john oliver is really not fucking around 
i-eat-men-like-air:

john oliver is really not fucking around 
i-eat-men-like-air:

john oliver is really not fucking around 
i-eat-men-like-air:

john oliver is really not fucking around 
+
+
+

Promo stills for episode 4.02, The State of the Union. The rest can be viewed at SpoilerTv.

Promo stills for episode 4.02, The State of the Union. The rest can be viewed at SpoilerTv.

Promo stills for episode 4.02, The State of the Union. The rest can be viewed at SpoilerTv.

Promo stills for episode 4.02, The State of the Union. The rest can be viewed at SpoilerTv.
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theblackdolllife:

(via Pinterest)
+
gradientlair:

!!!!!!!!!!
+
talented10th:

Barbara Ann Teer, (1937-2008) National Black Theater
+
soulbrotherv2:

Forbidden Fruit: Love Stories from the Underground Railroad by Betty Deramus
Forbidden Fruit is a collection of fascinating, largely untold tales of ordinary men and women who faced mobs, bloodhounds, bounty hunters, and bullets to be together — and defy a system that categorized blacks not only as servants, but as property.
Here you’ll meet, among other extraordinary characters, a fugitive slave from Virginia who spends seventeen years searching for his wife. A Georgia slave couple that sails for England with federal troops trailing behind. A white woman who falls in love with her deceased husband’s slave. A young slave girl who is delivered to her fiancé inside a wooden chest.
Acclaimed journalist Betty DeRamus gleaned these anecdotes from descendants of runaway slave couples, unpublished memoirs, Civil War records, census data, magazines, and dozens of previously untapped sources. This is a book about people pursuing love and achievement in a time of hate and severely limited opportunities. Though not all of the stories in Forbidden Fruit end in triumph, they all celebrate hope, passion, courage, and triumph of the human spirit. [book link]
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digg:

Instagram photos and videos from the heart of Hong Kong.
digg:

Instagram photos and videos from the heart of Hong Kong.
digg:

Instagram photos and videos from the heart of Hong Kong.
digg:

Instagram photos and videos from the heart of Hong Kong.
digg:

Instagram photos and videos from the heart of Hong Kong.
+
burnedshoes:

© Adama Kouyaté
#1: Ségou, 1971#2: Bouaké, 1967
The son of a master shoemaker, Malian photographer Adama Kouyaté was born in the French Sudanese village of Bougouni (now Mali) in 1928. A contemporary of Malik Sidibé and Seydou Keïta, his introduction to photography occurred in 1946 when on Christmas day, he sat with a friend for a studio portrait in Bamako. The picture was so beautiful that from then on he dreamt of only one thing, becoming a photographer.
When in 1947 he decided to learn photography, he approached the masters, learning from the likes of such photography pioneers as Bakary Doumbia and of course, Pierre Garnier, “the white master of West African photography” for whom, after much insistence, he became a laboratory assistant in his studio “Photo Hall Soudanais”.
In 1949, Adama Kouyaté opened his first studio, “Photo Hall Kati”, in Kati, near Bamako. In 1964, he left for Ouagadougou in Burkina, then in 1966 went to the Ivory Coast city of Bouaké. Finally, in 1969, he returned to Mali and settled in Ségou, located on the route to the Dogon. His studio, “Photo Hall d’Union”, located on the central commercial Elhadj Oumar Tall street, was an immediate success.
As is shown in the book “Studios d’Afrique” published by Gang books, the photographer never ceases to innovate in this tiny storefront space. In the heat of the spotlights, the photographer tries to communicate with his subject. It is important to note that until the 1980’s, the studio was an obligatory rite of passage for people wanting to remember key times in their lives, most people didn’t own a personal camera. (read more)
burnedshoes:

© Adama Kouyaté
#1: Ségou, 1971#2: Bouaké, 1967
The son of a master shoemaker, Malian photographer Adama Kouyaté was born in the French Sudanese village of Bougouni (now Mali) in 1928. A contemporary of Malik Sidibé and Seydou Keïta, his introduction to photography occurred in 1946 when on Christmas day, he sat with a friend for a studio portrait in Bamako. The picture was so beautiful that from then on he dreamt of only one thing, becoming a photographer.
When in 1947 he decided to learn photography, he approached the masters, learning from the likes of such photography pioneers as Bakary Doumbia and of course, Pierre Garnier, “the white master of West African photography” for whom, after much insistence, he became a laboratory assistant in his studio “Photo Hall Soudanais”.
In 1949, Adama Kouyaté opened his first studio, “Photo Hall Kati”, in Kati, near Bamako. In 1964, he left for Ouagadougou in Burkina, then in 1966 went to the Ivory Coast city of Bouaké. Finally, in 1969, he returned to Mali and settled in Ségou, located on the route to the Dogon. His studio, “Photo Hall d’Union”, located on the central commercial Elhadj Oumar Tall street, was an immediate success.
As is shown in the book “Studios d’Afrique” published by Gang books, the photographer never ceases to innovate in this tiny storefront space. In the heat of the spotlights, the photographer tries to communicate with his subject. It is important to note that until the 1980’s, the studio was an obligatory rite of passage for people wanting to remember key times in their lives, most people didn’t own a personal camera. (read more)
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+
i9uess:

http://i9uess.tumblr.com
+
cultureisnotacostume:

buzzfeed:

A 15-Step Guide To Understanding Why Hong Kong Has Erupted In Protest

I know, buzzfeed is problematic, but this is a good article if you don’t already know what’s going on in Hong Kong
-Allyssa
cultureisnotacostume:

buzzfeed:

A 15-Step Guide To Understanding Why Hong Kong Has Erupted In Protest

I know, buzzfeed is problematic, but this is a good article if you don’t already know what’s going on in Hong Kong
-Allyssa
cultureisnotacostume:

buzzfeed:

A 15-Step Guide To Understanding Why Hong Kong Has Erupted In Protest

I know, buzzfeed is problematic, but this is a good article if you don’t already know what’s going on in Hong Kong
-Allyssa
cultureisnotacostume:

buzzfeed:

A 15-Step Guide To Understanding Why Hong Kong Has Erupted In Protest

I know, buzzfeed is problematic, but this is a good article if you don’t already know what’s going on in Hong Kong
-Allyssa
+
blulotusrises:

kbox-in-the-box:

sktagg23:

Dr. Seuss was not even in the general area of fucking around.

Like Garth Marenghi, Dr. Seuss believed that subtext was for cowards.


aka subs are for WEAK MOTHERFUCKERS 👌👌
blulotusrises:

kbox-in-the-box:

sktagg23:

Dr. Seuss was not even in the general area of fucking around.

Like Garth Marenghi, Dr. Seuss believed that subtext was for cowards.


aka subs are for WEAK MOTHERFUCKERS 👌👌
blulotusrises:

kbox-in-the-box:

sktagg23:

Dr. Seuss was not even in the general area of fucking around.

Like Garth Marenghi, Dr. Seuss believed that subtext was for cowards.


aka subs are for WEAK MOTHERFUCKERS 👌👌
blulotusrises:

kbox-in-the-box:

sktagg23:

Dr. Seuss was not even in the general area of fucking around.

Like Garth Marenghi, Dr. Seuss believed that subtext was for cowards.


aka subs are for WEAK MOTHERFUCKERS 👌👌
blulotusrises:

kbox-in-the-box:

sktagg23:

Dr. Seuss was not even in the general area of fucking around.

Like Garth Marenghi, Dr. Seuss believed that subtext was for cowards.


aka subs are for WEAK MOTHERFUCKERS 👌👌
blulotusrises:

kbox-in-the-box:

sktagg23:

Dr. Seuss was not even in the general area of fucking around.

Like Garth Marenghi, Dr. Seuss believed that subtext was for cowards.


aka subs are for WEAK MOTHERFUCKERS 👌👌
blulotusrises:

kbox-in-the-box:

sktagg23:

Dr. Seuss was not even in the general area of fucking around.

Like Garth Marenghi, Dr. Seuss believed that subtext was for cowards.


aka subs are for WEAK MOTHERFUCKERS 👌👌
+
sonofbaldwin:

knowledgeequalsblackpower:

dhaarijmens:

bemusedlybespectacled:

washingtonpost:

In a post-Ferguson world, Americans increasingly doubt the notion of colorblind justice.

HOW THE FUCK DID THE PERCENTAGE GO UP FOR WHITE PEOPLE
IN WHAT UNIVERSE DOES A POLICE OFFICER SHOOTING AN UNARMED BLACK KID (AND THEN ATTEMPTING TO COVER IT UP AFTER THE FACT) CONSTITUTE EQUAL TREATMENT IN THE JUSTICE SYSTEM
LIKE WHO LOOKS AT THAT AND GOES “WELL, BEFORE I THOUGHT THAT THERE WAS RACISM IN OUR JUSTICE SYSTEM, BUT THEN THIS SHIT HAPPENED AND NOW I SEE THAT IT’S PERFECTLY EQUAL”
WHAT THE FUCK

This increase can be explained by an interesting social phenomenon called ‘denial.’

They benefit from not knowing.. and from believing in myths. 

Comparing beliefs before and after Michael Brown’s murder and the surrounding revelations of racism that have sprung out of it, white people, as a demographic believe, MORE THAN EVER BEFORE, that the criminal justice system treats whites and blacks equally.That is, MORE white people believe the criminal justice system treats black equally now than they did before Michael Brown’s death.In essence, for white people, blatant systemic oppression and the murder of an unarmed young black man gives them even more reason to believe blacks are treated fairly by the system.This confirms an earlier study that said the more you tell white people that the system is inherently racist, the more they supported harsher punishments for black people: http://thinkprogress.org/justice/2014/08/07/3468368/study-white-people-support-harsher-criminal-laws-if-they-think-more-black-people-are-arrested/Marinate on these inhumanities for a second.